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Adele Shotton-Pugh

Adele Shotton-Pugh

As an interior Designer I embrace all styles, modern and traditional. I am passionate about fabric and different ways to use it and my own style reflects that. I love colour (if I had to choose a single favourite it would be Duckegg – something my family tease me about relentlessly!) and I love texture, so in terms of fabric there’s very little I don’t like. I don’t mind if it’s silk, polyester, jacquard or crewel work (and I have all in my home); or if it’s on eyelets, goblets or swags and tails, just so long as there’s fabric at my windows to inject colour, warmth and texture.

I love nothing more than the challenge of a bare, bland window and the creative possibilities it presents. My position as on-line Interior Designer for Terrys Fabrics, affords me the opportunity to indulge my passion every day. And whilst there are obviously other important features to consider in an interior scheme, to me, it’s what you do at you do at your windows that pull’s a finished look together and can make or break a room.

To me, windows are the most important and exciting part of interior design. Not least because they offer this valuable opportunity to use fabric to add colour and texture, but primarily and most importantly because they are the source of light without which rooms would have no character or function. Capturing, enhancing and manipulating that light by dressing windows with expedient textures, is therefore vital to the finished ambience of any room.

If, as they say… “the eyes are the windows to the soul”… then I think it follows that… “windows are the soul of any room”. And in my eyes, every unfurnished window, regardless of shape, size, proportion or age, presents itself as a blank canvas, on which I can create a beautiful work of art!

Favourite Music Album: If I had to chose one, Josh Groban – Closer. But, my taste is wide and varied, everything from classical to Coldplay, Josh Groban to Club Anthems – and oh yes – I quite like my names sake – Adele!

Favourite Book: My notebook! I don’t do novels, I never have the time. I read curtain, craft and cake books which I have bookcases full of – oh, and childrens’ story books. The Gruffalo is our favourite, closely followed by Room on the Broom.

Favourite Colour: Duckegg and all related shades of aqua, turquoise and teal.

Favourite Season: Spring, without a doubt!

From Whom and/or Where do you get your inspiration from: My tastes are quite eclectic and my design sense and style evolves continually, but I seem to be drawn to designs that are classically rooted but modern, colourful, unusual and original. I like everything from the frivolous eccentricity of Lawrence Llewellyn Bowen to the cutting edge designs and world class styles of Kelly Hoppen.
I am inspired by the original creativity and natural talent of other people and I get real pleasure from seeing ‘old things’ rejuvenated into something useful, beautiful and delightful once more.

Favourite Design Era/Style: As an interior Designer I embrace all styles, modern and traditional, but I particularly like to take inspiration from the Regency and Victorian eras as I am passionate about fabric and different ways to use it and those eras reflected that. I love colour and I love texture, so in terms of fabric there’s very little I don’t like. I don’t mind if it’s silk, polyester, jacquard or crewel work (and I have all in my home); just so long as there’s fabric at my windows to inject colour, warmth and texture.

Personal design ‘No-No’: Celebrity endorsements, pink, pink, pink and frills. Orange and red together, red and pink together, antique pine furniture,  clutter.

Personal Design ‘Thumbs Up’: Elegant simplicity, clean lines, defined spaces, sufficient and thoughtful storage space for the intended purpose of any room.

If money was no object my bedroom would look like… : A calm haven of duckegg, pale metallics and white or cream, with plenty of open space and a relaxing sitting area, preferably out on to a balcony with a stunning view, for quiet reflection and inspired thinking.

If money was no object my Kitchen would look like… : Nigella Lawson’s! It would be well stocked and beautifully lit day and night, with an adjacent and spacious eating/entertaing area. It would be a well used and very sociable space that would be the central hub of the entire household, with expansive bi-fold doors to flood it with natural daylight that would extend it seamlessly in to the garden.

If money was no object my Living Room would look like… : A sumptuous period style room taking its influences from the Regency and Victorian eras with, as they say, a modern twist. It would be spacious yet inviting, cool and airy yet cosy, but most of all sociable and homely and would look lived in, in preference to looking like a pristine show house.

If money was no object my home would be… :  a modest sized house tastefully decorated and filled with a thoughtful collection of all the styles, colours and textures that I find aesthetically pleasing; on a generous piece of land, preferably situated somewhere – anywhere – with a warm climate and either a lake or a sea view.

Top Tip: There’s two:

Don’t be a fashion victim. Yves Saints Laurent famously stated “Fashion is passing but style is eternal.”  This is sound advice for fashion and interiors. Be true to yourself and your own personal style, likes and dislikes. Research what’s up to date and on trend by all means, as you might find valuable inspiration, but don’t have something just because it’s branded fashionable. It won’t necessarily suit you, your home, or your tastes.

Don’t be afraid to experiment. Don’t be afraid of using colour or trying different styles in your interiors. If you are a cautious decorator creep and go. Introduce colour and pattern a little a time with accessories, rugs or large wall art. All of these can add style and impact but are all easily reversed or removed. Make yourself a mood board of all the elements you like before you begin your interior decoration. This will give you a simple, but usually effective, visual overview of whether or not they work together. But don’t be afraid to try something a little different.

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