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Designer Insights

Designer Insights with Christina Hilborne

Christina Hilborne is a sustainable furniture designer, creating accent pieces from her self-named design studio in British Columbia. Christina began her journey in design after creating an “ugly” recycling box in college and then falling in love with joinery. She now has 20 years of experience honing her design skills, as well as an ever-growing passion for the planet. Christina’s ultimate goal is to create unique and provocative furniture, that are also sustainable. So we are proud to bring you the Designer Insights of Christina Hilborne.

Designer Insights - Christina Hilborne

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– Transcript –

1) In your own words describe your unique style and creative aesthetic?

It’s never occurred to me to try and describe my style – seems amusingly presumptuous – I’ll leave that up to the people who choose to include my work as part of their lives.

2) When starting a new project, what is your creative process?

I think “What do I feel like making now?” And then I make it. Sometimes I love the result, sometimes I can’t stand it.

3) Out of the creative people you have worked with, who is it that you respect and admire the most?

Lee Bowers of Stellar Wood in Colorado. His craftsmanship is superb, but what I admire most about him is the way he conducts himself in life, every day. He and his family make a habit of being stewards of the earth; he considers his every action, inside and outside the workshop; and he honours his word. Plus he’s a riot. Being a slick designer or maker doesn’t impress me all that much, but when I find a noble soul inside that designer/maker I start to get impressed.

4) When looking for inspiration is there a particular thing you do to get inspired?

I finish a project haha. When my bench is empty the creative cogs start turning.

5) What has brought you to this point in your career? And what is your advice for people looking to follow in your footsteps?

I think it’s an inherent inability to settle for the norm. I’d go crazy working 9 to 5 with someone else telling me what to do, not using my imagination, not creating. I am driven to do what I do, and here I am.

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