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Friday Faux Pas
Interior Design

Friday Faux Pas: Shipwrecked or Just Wrecked?

Friday Faux Pas Title

In our search this week, for an image for our Friday Faux Pas post, we came across this little gem!

Friday Faux Pas Shipwrecked

Now, as an interior designer, I’m all for interesting and varied texture within my interior schemes, I’m all for using materials from nature and I’m all for recycling and jazzing up your junk – but I’m all out of admiration for this! – and I didn’t think we’d top the straw wallpaper from two weeks ago.

I acknowledge the thought process and creative thinking that has gone in to this, whole heartedly, but it’s not working for me.

Not only is the ceiling overbearing with a positively claustrophobic effect, but the eclectic mix of the random ceiling, retro buttoned office chairs, modern overhead pendant lights, board room style table and sate of the art laptop and TV screen, is just too confusing for words.

The ‘ceiling’ comes down onto the walls, wraps itself around the bookcase and eventually brings the eye round to the window… let’s not even mention what’s going on there!

I don’t think there are any quick fixes here, I would just get the builder in, repair (or better still replace) the ceiling and start again from scratch. At a push I would save the buttoned swivel chairs.

So how should you use wood in your interiors?

There are a number of stylish and effective ways to use wood indoors, that won’t leave you with any interior design disasters.

Use wood at your windows – Wooden Venetian blinds can warm a cold looking window and offer versatile light filtration and privacy at the same time. They are available these days in all shades of natural wood from light to darkest mahogany and oak and in trendy colours too.

If your budget runs to it, traditional wooden shutters add architectural interest as well as function and privacy and would give a sympathetic approach to a period interior.

Use wood on your walls – Wood panelling, veneer sheets or tongue and groove cladding can look great if you don’t go for overkill!

Keep the tongue and grove to the bottom half of the walls, e.g. to chair rail height and keep the colour light or paint it with a trendy wood wash or eggshell finish paint. Whitewashed or white painted panelling will add a lovely expansive feel without making the room look cold.

For veneer sheets or panelling limit it to a feature wall to add warmth, contrast and texture.

Use wood on your floors – Laminate, natural wood or Parquet flooring, are all good ways of including wood in your interior decor. Not only do they add warmth and colour, but they are practical and easy to maintain and care for. For large expanses of floor consider adding rugs for comfort and to break up the expanse and add co-ordinated detail.

Wooden Furniture – Buying wooden furniture such as bookshelves, desks, cabinets and coffee tables in a matching suite will give both a natural and neutral scheme, which will accommodate a myriad of colour schemes. You don’t have to stick to a suite of furniture however. You can mix and match as long as the different pieces suit each other and the room, in terms of scale, style and colour.

Accessorise – Look for wooden accessories that don’t necessarily have to be a permanent fixture. Large pieces such as room divider screens, large wall hangings, wooden framed mirrors or a tasteful sculpture used as a statement piece, will make an impact and can even set the tone or a theme for an interior scheme.

We’ll be back next week with even more design disasters in our next Friday Faux Pas.

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